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JPE CMOS Author-Date Style Guidelines


Sample Citations for the Journal of Philosophy of Emotion

This style sheet has been adapted from the The Chicago Manual of Style

Title: Journal of Philosophy of Emotion

Applies To: All Works Containing Citations

Created On: 2019-02-28 22:25:25

Last Edited: 2023-12-05

 

The JPE uses the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition, as its primary manual of style for usage, grammar, and citations. For all articles and symposiums (including book symposiums) it specifically employs the Author-Date Reference citation style, capitalizing all titles (including  journal article titles), and with endnotes. Please also ensure that as many DOIs are provided to ensure proper CrossRef referencing. Furthermore, please review the papers published in our issues for actual examples. It also employs the following idiosyncratic conventions noted below.


Use of Gendered Nouns/Pronouns:  The JPE asks authors to be mindful of the ascription of genders and their use of gendered pronouns in their work, especially when ascribing genders to the subjects of their examples or when speaking of a generalized group, such as humankind or humanity. Authors who submit work that typically use female subjects in examples with negative connotations will be asked to revise their examples, and the use of the term ‘mankind’ should only be used when referring to the kind to which all men belong rather than humanity in general.


Mutually Inclusive Disjunction (or): The JPE asks authors to use the term ‘or’ only to indicate a mutually inclusive disjunction rather than a mutually exclusive disjunction.


Mutually Exclusive Disjunction (either-or): The JPE asks authors to use the terms ‘either-or’ whenever indicating a mutually exclusive disjunction, and to maintain the use of the term ‘or’ to only indicate a mutually inclusive disjunction.

(Please note that the JPE does not require authors to ensure that their manuscripts conform to the style guidelines before submitting them for consideration. The JPE, however, does require authors to ensure that their final, pre-publication draft conforms to the style guidelines provided at the time of submission. The publication of any accepted manuscript may be delayed if it does not conform to the noted style guidelines.)


Overview of Chicago Manual of Style: The author-date system is used by many in the physical, natural, and social sciences and is recommended by Chicago for works in those areas. Sources are cited in the text, usually in parentheses, by the author’s last (family) name, the publication date of the work cited, and a page number if needed. Full details appear in the reference list—usually titled “References” or “Works Cited”—in which the year of publication appears immediately after the author’s name. This arrangement makes it easy to follow a text citation to the corresponding full source in the reference list. (In electronic formats, text citations may be linked to their corresponding reference list entries.)


Text citations: Like many other cultural fields, the video game industry is one that rewards novelty, especially when it is packaged in terms that are recognizable to consumers and critics (Lampel, Lant, and Shamsie 2000; Hutter 2011). . . . But the forefront of the industry finds continuous experimentation with the singular challenge of video gaming: how to create a convincing form of narrative storytelling that is nonetheless animated, perhaps uniquely so, by the actions of the users (Bissell 2011).


City and State (for US) or City and Country Info: For historical reasons, please provide the city and state of publication if the location is in the United States, and city and country information is the location of publication is outside the US. 


DOI: Please provide DOI information for all references in which a DOI is available. One can easily check for DOI information through this free Crossref resource: https://www.crossref.org/guestquery/. If providing a weblink DOI, there is no need to indicate that it is a DOI; if providing the DOI number, please indicate that it is a DOI:


Reference list entries:

 

Author-date references versus notes and bibliography: The author-date system differs primarily in its use of parenthetical text citations rather than citations in numbered notes and, in the bibliography (called a reference list in author-date style), the placement for the year of publication. 


Notes and bibliography entries as models for author-date references: Most reference list entries are identical to entries in a bibliography except for the position of the year of publication, which in a reference list follows the author’s name. Unlike bibliography entries, each entry in the reference list must correspond to a work cited in the text. Text citations differ from citations in notes by presenting only the author’s last name and the year of publication, followed by a page number or other locator, if any.


Basic structure of a reference list entry: In a reference list entry, the year of publication is the second element, following the author’s name. Otherwise, a reference list entry is structured like an entry in a bibliography: the elements are separated by periods, and the first-listed author’s name, according to which the entry is alphabetized in the reference list, is usually inverted (last name first). Titles are capitalized headline-style unless they are in a language other than English; titles of larger works such as books and journals are italicized; and titles of smaller works such as journal articles are presented in roman and enclosed in quotation marks. Noun forms such as editor, translator, volume, and edition are abbreviated, but verb forms such as edited by and translated by are spelled out.


Basic structure of an in-text citation: In the author-date system, a citation in the text usually appears in parentheses and includes only the first two elements in a reference list—the author and the year of publication (hence the name of the system), with no intervening punctuation. A page number or other locator may be added, following a comma. Terms such as editor or translator, abbreviated in a reference list, are omitted from a text citation. In a parenthetical reference to two or more works, a semicolon usually separates each work from the next.


Author-date system with notes: Where footnotes or endnotes are used to supplement the author-date system, source citations within notes are treated in the same way as in text.


Book: Reference list entries (in alphabetical order):

In-text citations:


Chapter or other part of an edited book: In the reference list, include the page range for the chapter or part. In the text, cite specific pages.

Reference list entry:

In-text citation:

In some cases, you may want to cite the collection as a whole instead.

Reference list entry:

In-text citation:


Translated book:

Reference list entry:

In-text citation:

 

E-book: For books consulted online, include a URL or the name of the database in the reference list entry. Reference list entries (in alphabetical order). For other types of e-books, name the format. If no fixed page numbers are available, cite a section title or a chapter or other number in the text, if any (or simply omit).

Reference list entries (in alphabetical order):

In-text citations:

 

Journal article: In the reference list, include the page range for the whole article. In the text, cite specific page numbers. For articles consulted online, include the DOI (Digital Object Identifier) as a permanent URL that begins https://doi.org/. 

Reference list entries (in alphabetical order):

In-text citations:

Journal articles often list many authors, especially in the sciences. If there are four or more authors, list up to ten in the reference list; in the text, list only the first, followed by et al. (“and others”). For more than ten authors (not shown here), list the first seven in the reference list, followed by et al.

Reference list entry:

In-text citation:

 

News or magazine article: Articles from newspapers or news sites, magazines, blogs, and the like are cited similarly. In the reference list, it can be helpful to repeat the year with sources that are cited also by month and day. Page numbers, if any, can be cited in the text but are omitted from a reference list entry. If you consulted the article online, include a URL or the name of the database.

Reference list entries (in alphabetical order):

In-text citation:

Readers’ comments are cited in the text but omitted from a reference list.

In-text citation:

 

Book review:

Reference list entry:

In-text citation:

 

Interview:

Reference list entry:

In-text citation:

 

Thesis or dissertation:

Reference list entry:

In-text citation:

 

Website content: It is often sufficient simply to describe web pages and other website content in the text (“As of May 1, 2017, Yale’s home page listed . . .”). If a more formal citation is needed, it may be styled like the examples below. For a source that does not list a date of publication or revision, use n.d. (for “no date”) in place of the year and include an access date.

Reference list entries (in alphabetical order):

In-text citations:

 

Social media content: Citations of content shared through social media can usually be limited to the text (as in the first example below). If a more formal citation is needed, a reference list entry may be appropriate. In place of a title, quote up to the first 160 characters of the post. Comments are cited in reference to the original post.

Text:

Reference list entries (in alphabetical order):

In-text citations:

 

Personal communication: Personal communications, including email and text messages and direct messages sent through social media, are usually cited in the text only, as an endnote; they are rarely included in a reference list. When citing such information, please make sure that the relevance of the citation is clear in the surrounding text, e.g., the topic of the email correspondence.

In-text citation, as a note:


JPE HEADING STYLE GUIDELINES


Text font style and size, except for the article title:  All text, except for the article title, should be in 11-point font, Verdana. Verdana is used for internal vetting and the peer review process, and the text is eventually converted to  EB Garamond during the production process.



Level-one Heading: Level-one heading (not including the article title) should be in bold ALL CAPS, with center alignment and a single line space between the last sentence of the previous section and the level-one heading, and the level-one heading and the first sentence of level-one section:


Mauris sed tincidunt arcu. Fusce tortor purus, tempus quis ex sed, sodales lobortis libero. Sed rutrum sed quam interdum rhoncus. Sed erat nibh, dignissim in aliquam ut, hendrerit ac turpis. Donec maximus, odio at pulvinar dignissim, ipsum purus luctus ante, quis venenatis diam sem at quam. Ut maximus aliquet massa, eget tempor metus volutpat ut. Integer vestibulum sit amet lacus et rutrum. Nulla bibendum velit at augue iaculis placerat. Sed dictum convallis lorem, at egestas nisl malesuada vitae. . . . Last sentence of previous section.


LEVEL-ONE HEADING


First sentence of this section . . . Mauris sed tincidunt arcu. Fusce tortor purus, tempus quis ex sed, sodales lobortis libero. Sed rutrum sed quam interdum rhoncus. Sed erat nibh, dignissim in aliquam ut, hendrerit ac turpis. Donec maximus, odio at pulvinar dignissim, ipsum purus luctus ante, quis venenatis diam sem at quam. Ut maximus aliquet massa, eget tempor metus volutpat ut. Integer vestibulum sit amet lacus et rutrum. Nulla bibendum velit at augue iaculis placerat. Sed dictum convallis lorem, at egestas nisl malesuada vitae.



Level-two Heading: All level-two headings should be in bold Title Case, with alignment flushed to the left, and a single line space between the last sentence of the previous section and the level-two heading, and no space between the level-two heading and the first sentence of the level-two section:


Mauris sed tincidunt arcu. Fusce tortor purus, tempus quis ex sed, sodales lobortis libero. Sed rutrum sed quam interdum rhoncus. Sed erat nibh, dignissim in aliquam ut, hendrerit ac turpis. Donec maximus, odio at pulvinar dignissim, ipsum purus luctus ante, quis venenatis diam sem at quam. Ut maximus aliquet massa, eget tempor metus volutpat ut. Integer vestibulum sit amet lacus et rutrum. Nulla bibendum velit at augue iaculis placerat. Sed dictum convallis lorem, at egestas nisl malesuada vitae. . . . Last sentence of previous section.


Level-two Heading

First sentence of this section . . . Mauris sed tincidunt arcu. Fusce tortor purus, tempus quis ex sed, sodales lobortis libero. Sed rutrum sed quam interdum rhoncus. Sed erat nibh, dignissim in aliquam ut, hendrerit ac turpis. Donec maximus, odio at pulvinar dignissim, ipsum purus luctus ante, quis venenatis diam sem at quam. Ut maximus aliquet massa, eget tempor metus volutpat ut. Integer vestibulum sit amet lacus et rutrum. Nulla bibendum velit at augue iaculis placerat. Sed dictum convallis lorem, at egestas nisl malesuada vitae.



Level-three Heading: All level-three headings should be in bold, italicized Title Case, with alignment flushed to the left, and run-in with the first sentence of the level-three section, with a period placed after the level-three heading, before the first sentence of the level-three section:


Mauris sed tincidunt arcu. Fusce tortor purus, tempus quis ex sed, sodales lobortis libero. Sed rutrum sed quam interdum rhoncus. Sed erat nibh, dignissim in aliquam ut, hendrerit ac turpis. Donec maximus, odio at pulvinar dignissim, ipsum purus luctus ante, quis venenatis diam sem at quam. Ut maximus aliquet massa, eget tempor metus volutpat ut. Integer vestibulum sit amet lacus et rutrum. Nulla bibendum velit at augue iaculis placerat. Sed dictum convallis lorem, at egestas nisl malesuada vitae. . . . Last sentence of previous section.


Level-three Heading. First sentence of this section . . . Mauris sed tincidunt arcu. Fusce tortor purus, tempus quis ex sed, sodales lobortis libero. Sed rutrum sed quam interdum rhoncus. Sed erat nibh, dignissim in aliquam ut, hendrerit ac turpis. Donec maximus, odio at pulvinar dignissim, ipsum purus luctus ante, quis venenatis diam sem at quam. Ut maximus aliquet massa, eget tempor metus volutpat ut. Integer vestibulum sit amet lacus et rutrum. Nulla bibendum velit at augue iaculis placerat. Sed dictum convallis lorem, at egestas nisl malesuada vitae.


Please do not use any more than three levels of headings, after the title.

JPE NOTES GUIDELINES

The JPE uses endnotes rather than footnotes. All endnotes should be indicated with a number, starting with 1, between brackets [1], both in text and in the endnotes, as highlighted in red:


Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent aliquet magna libero, sit amet fringilla metus pellentesque id. Vestibulum porta ante pharetra ipsum vestibulum, a maximus justo ultrices. Aliquam mi nibh, vehicula non ornare in, molestie vitae nisi. Suspendisse cursus nisi quis ante luctus vulputate.[1] In sodales elit sed erat luctus dapibus. Nunc eleifend risus vitae tincidunt ultricies. Aliquam ornare, leo ut maximus eleifend, purus orci semper mi, quis tempor lacus lectus sed metus. Vestibulum enim diam, vestibulum id ipsum quis, auctor faucibus mauris. Sed ac augue neque. Proin ac porttitor lorem. Aliquam pretium, metus sed lacinia finibus, mauris felis volutpat ligula, nec posuere sem turpis ut lorem. Duis non vulputate sem.


LEVEL-ONE HEADING


Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent aliquet magna libero,[2] sit amet fringilla metus pellentesque id. Vestibulum porta ante pharetra ipsum vestibulum, a maximus justo ultrices. Aliquam mi nibh, vehicula non ornare in, molestie vitae nisi. Suspendisse cursus nisi quis ante luctus vulputate. In sodales elit sed erat luctus dapibus. Nunc eleifend risus vitae tincidunt ultricies. Aliquam ornare, leo ut maximus eleifend, purus orci semper mi, quis tempor lacus lectus sed metus. Vestibulum enim diam, vestibulum id ipsum quis, auctor faucibus mauris.[3] Sed ac augue neque. Proin ac porttitor lorem. Aliquam pretium, metus sed lacinia finibus, mauris felis volutpat ligula, nec posuere sem turpis ut lorem. Duis non vulputate sem.


Notes

Acknowledgment(s): Any acknowledgments should be added as an unnumbered note, before any numbered notes, with the word "Acknowledgment(s)," with or without an 's' depending on the number of people acknowledged, before a colon.


[1] Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent aliquet magna libero, sit amet fringilla metus pellentesque id. Vestibulum porta ante pharetra ipsum vestibulum, a maximus justo ultrices. Aliquam mi nibh, vehicula non ornare in, molestie vitae nisi. Suspendisse cursus nisi quis ante luctus vulputate.


[2] Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent aliquet magna libero, sit amet fringilla metus pellentesque id. Vestibulum porta ante pharetra ipsum vestibulum, a maximus justo ultrices. Aliquam mi nibh, vehicula non ornare in, molestie vitae nisi. Suspendisse cursus nisi quis ante luctus vulputate. 


[3] Sam Gomez, email message to author, August 1, 2017.